Maudsley Philosophy Group is primarily

concerned with three interconnected strands of theory.


Maudsley Philosophy Group is primarily concerned with three interconnected strands of theory.


Phenomenology, or ‘the phenomenological movement’, is a philosophical tradition with origins in Europe in the 19th century. It is primarily interested in the human experience of time, body, self, emotion, etc. and has had a wide influence across the sciences, arts and humanities which continues to this day.

Phenomenology

Phenomenology, or ‘the phenomenological movement’, is a philosophical tradition with origins in Europe in the 19th century. It is primarily interested in the human experience of time, body, self, emotion, etc. and has had a wide influence across the sciences, arts and humanities which continues to this day.

There is a growing body of opinion that the exercise of power can distort thinking and create personality changes in leaders that affect their decision making. Lord David Owen founded the Daedalus Trust to raise awareness of such changes and the MPG now continues this interest.

Power and Personality

There is a growing body of opinion that the exercise of power can distort thinking and create personality changes in leaders that affect their decision making. Lord David Owen founded the Daedalus Trust to raise awareness of such changes and the MPG now continues this interest.

Models of Mind

Models of Mind describes the main categories which shape psychiatrists' approach to and understanding of mental disorders. Clinically influential models include biological, psychodynamic, and cognitive, but there are many other influential models such as the social constructionist model or religious accounts of mental distress.

Models of Mind describes the main categories which shape psychiatrists' approach to and understanding of mental disorders. Clinically influential models include biological, psychodynamic, and cognitive, but there are many other influential models such as the social constructionist model or religious accounts of mental distress.

Upcoming event

Hubris in Democratic Athens

Prof Hugh Bowden 04 April 2019, 18:00

The Athenian democracy identified a specific offence of ‘hubris’, punishable by law. At the same time leading Athenians were expected to use the institutions of the democracy in a competition for ‘honour’, to the extent that many of the elements that David Owen has identified as criteria for ‘hubris syndrome’ were considered as positively desirable in Athenian politicians.

Further info

Prof Raymond Tallis. Credit: Tom Prater / Maudsley Philosophy Group

Latest event

'I am' and 'It is': Reflections on the Embodied Subject - further info

Prof Raymond Tallis 31 January 2019